infinity-imagined

thelatvian:

Fernan Federici – Microscopic Photographs of Plants

These surreal images are microscopic photographs of various plants, taken by Dr. Fernan Federici. He is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Cambridge working in the area of Synthetic Biology. He started his career studying two years of Engineering at the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Mendoza, Argentina) and then moved to Chile to obtain an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology. Later he moved to England to do a PhD in Biological Sciences at Cambridge. Each of Federici’s photographs depicts the cellular life of a different form of flora, from rainforest specimen to coniferous forest inhabitants. The plants’ bright colors, hollow-looking cells and overall intensity make for some absolutely stunning photographs that are both visually arresting and thought-provoking. The vibrant and detailed photographs show just how intricate and beautiful nature really is.

currentsinbiology
ucresearch:

Study of leaping toads reveal the mechanisms that protect muscles
Most people are impressed by how a toad jumps. UC Irvine biologist Emanuel Azizi is more impressed by how one lands.
“Toads are ideal for studying jumping and landing because they’re so good at it,” he noted. “This work is providing the basic science on how muscles respond during high-impact behaviors like landing or falling.”
They discovered that during landing, toads’ muscles adapt to the varying intensity of impact. As the creatures hop over longer distances, their landing muscles increasingly shorten in anticipation of larger impacts.
This pattern indicates that rapid and coordinated responses of the nervous system can act to protect muscles from injury, said Azizi, who added that future efforts will be aimed at understanding what sensory information is used to modulate these responses.
Azizi’s findings on the underlying function of muscle control, he said, could one day improve rehabilitation programs for people with neuromuscular deficiencies.
Read More: UC Irvine study of leaping toads reveals muscle-protecting mechanism →

ucresearch:

Study of leaping toads reveal the mechanisms that protect muscles


Most people are impressed by how a toad jumps. UC Irvine biologist Emanuel Azizi is more impressed by how one lands.

“Toads are ideal for studying jumping and landing because they’re so good at it,” he noted. “This work is providing the basic science on how muscles respond during high-impact behaviors like landing or falling.”

They discovered that during landing, toads’ muscles adapt to the varying intensity of impact. As the creatures hop over longer distances, their landing muscles increasingly shorten in anticipation of larger impacts.

This pattern indicates that rapid and coordinated responses of the nervous system can act to protect muscles from injury, said Azizi, who added that future efforts will be aimed at understanding what sensory information is used to modulate these responses.

Azizi’s findings on the underlying function of muscle control, he said, could one day improve rehabilitation programs for people with neuromuscular deficiencies.

Read More: UC Irvine study of leaping toads reveals muscle-protecting mechanism