currentsinbiology
currentsinbiology:

Octopus supermom sets egg-brooding record
A female deep-sea octopus has broke the record for egg brooding. The mom, a Graneledone boreopacifica, held her eggs in her arms for 4.5 years, until they hatched—and she apparently died. Scientists first spotted her and her eggs in 2007 during one of their regular visits, via a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to the deep-sea habitat of Monterey Submarine Canyon off the coast of California. She was perched on a rocky outcrop 1397 meters below the ocean’s surface, with her arms curled around her clutch (see video above). Over the next 53 months, the scientists returned to the outcrop 18 times—and each time, there was the female, still patiently guarding her eggs, they report today in PLOS ONE. During their visits, they noticed that she never ate; rather than hunting crabs and shrimp, she pushed them away anytime they got too close to her eggs. She even ignored a tempting bit of crabmeat the scientists extended to her by means of one of the ROV’s arms. They suspect that she may have ingested damaged or unfertilized eggs to stay alive, but the marathon egg brooding took its toll. When the scientists first saw her, she was a pale purple, but over time she turned a ghostly white, her mantle shrank, her skin slackened, and her eyes grew cloudy. The researchers last saw her in September 2011. On their next visit the following month, she was gone; female octopuses invariably die after brooding. Only the tattered remnants of her empty egg capsules remained, indicating a successful hatch.
This female octopus grew frail during the years she spent brooding her eggs.

currentsinbiology:

Octopus supermom sets egg-brooding record

A female deep-sea octopus has broke the record for egg brooding. The mom, a Graneledone boreopacifica, held her eggs in her arms for 4.5 years, until they hatched—and she apparently died. Scientists first spotted her and her eggs in 2007 during one of their regular visits, via a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to the deep-sea habitat of Monterey Submarine Canyon off the coast of California. She was perched on a rocky outcrop 1397 meters below the ocean’s surface, with her arms curled around her clutch (see video above). Over the next 53 months, the scientists returned to the outcrop 18 times—and each time, there was the female, still patiently guarding her eggs, they report today in PLOS ONE. During their visits, they noticed that she never ate; rather than hunting crabs and shrimp, she pushed them away anytime they got too close to her eggs. She even ignored a tempting bit of crabmeat the scientists extended to her by means of one of the ROV’s arms. They suspect that she may have ingested damaged or unfertilized eggs to stay alive, but the marathon egg brooding took its toll. When the scientists first saw her, she was a pale purple, but over time she turned a ghostly white, her mantle shrank, her skin slackened, and her eyes grew cloudy. The researchers last saw her in September 2011. On their next visit the following month, she was gone; female octopuses invariably die after brooding. Only the tattered remnants of her empty egg capsules remained, indicating a successful hatch.

This female octopus grew frail during the years she spent brooding her eggs.

currentsinbiology
currentsinbiology:

This is seriously sad.
Plastics Don’t Disappear, They  End Up In Seabirds’ Bellies - NPR

The vast majority of debris in the ocean — about 75 percent of it — is made of plastic. While plastic may break down into smaller and smaller pieces, some as small as grains of sand, these pieces are never truly biodegradable. The plastic bits, some small enough that they’re called microplastics, threaten marine life like fish and birds, explains Richard Thompson, a professor of marine biology at Plymouth University in the U.K.

"The smaller the piece of debris, the more accessible it is — and the wider the range of creatures that could potentially eat it," says Thompson, who talked with NPR’s Melissa Block about his research on the effects of these tiny particles

A dead young albatross on the Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. More of photographer Chris Jordan’s work on the effects of plastics on seabirds .

currentsinbiology:

This is seriously sad.

Plastics Don’t Disappear, They  End Up In Seabirds’ Bellies - NPR

The vast majority of debris in the ocean — about 75 percent of it — is made of plastic. While plastic may break down into smaller and smaller pieces, some as small as grains of sand, these pieces are never truly biodegradable. The plastic bits, some small enough that they’re called microplastics, threaten marine life like fish and birds, explains Richard Thompson, a professor of marine biology at Plymouth University in the U.K.

"The smaller the piece of debris, the more accessible it is — and the wider the range of creatures that could potentially eat it," says Thompson, who talked with NPR’s Melissa Block about his research on the effects of these tiny particles

A dead young albatross on the Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. More of photographer Chris Jordan’s work on the effects of plastics on seabirds .

humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"I’m a neuroscience researcher.""If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?""Listen to your inner voice.""You’re a scientist. Isn’t ‘inner voice’ a spiritual term?""Bullshit! You’ll hear scientists talking about following their inner voice as much as you’d hear a musician or a priest.""So how do you know which of your thoughts are your true inner voice?""All of them are! The question is— how much weight do you give them? How much authority do you give your own thoughts? Are you taking them seriously? Or are you sitting in front of the damn tube letting other people tell you what to think?"

humansofnewyork:

"I’m a neuroscience researcher."
"If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?"
"Listen to your inner voice."
"You’re a scientist. Isn’t ‘inner voice’ a spiritual term?"
"Bullshit! You’ll hear scientists talking about following their inner voice as much as you’d hear a musician or a priest."
"So how do you know which of your thoughts are your true inner voice?"
"All of them are! The question is— how much weight do you give them? How much authority do you give your own thoughts? Are you taking them seriously? Or are you sitting in front of the damn tube letting other people tell you what to think?"

humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun.""What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?""That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it.""Why is it a lousy question?""What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."

humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun."
"What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?"
"That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it."
"Why is it a lousy question?"
"What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."